Crispy Garlic Pork

Would you say NO to quick & easy flavor packed dishes that also comes with a crunch? Definitely not me. This one is no exception. Just a few ingredients along with some garnishes and you can achieve an eye pleasing and mouth-watering dish.

I love the crunchy flavor and texture that the panko bread crumbs gives off. My first experiment with panko bread crumb was in Panko Crusted Fish with Lemongrass Chili Sauce recipe. Panko is made from bread without crusts, thus it has a crisper, airier texture than most types of bread crumbs found in Western groceries. It flavorless really, and does not absorb as much oil when cook. If all you have is regular bread crumbs then you may substitute with that as well.

For an even bigger flavor you can marinade a day in advance but 2-3 hours prior in the fridge will also work too. I like to use pork cut that has a bit of fat as the leaner cut tend to taste a bit dry. An alternative to fresh garlic would be garlic powder. Make sure that the ingredient listed is garlic and no added salt, otherwise you will have to omit or adjust the salt content.

You can serve it fancy with a knife and fork along side pickled carrots and daikon or just grab a piece with your fingers and savor it with steamed rice YUM!

Crispy Garlic Pork (makes 1-2 servings accompany with other dishes)
(Sach Jrook Ktum Bompong) សាច់ជ្រូកខ្ទឹមបំពង

Ingredients
1/2 lb pork, slice 1/2 inch thick
5 gloves of garlic, peel and crushed
2-3 pinches salt
2-3 pinches black pepper
1/3 cup panko bread crumbs
oil for frying

Method:
Rub pork with crushed garlic and sprinkle on salt & pepper on both sides. If you are using garlic powder, you can mix the three ingredients and sprinkle on them at one. Massage the pork so the marinade get well distribute. Marinade in the fridge.

Bring marinade pork and allow to sit at room temperate to remove the chill.

Spread panko bread crumbs evenly on a plate. Lay each pork cut on the plate and lightly press into the bread crumbs to evenly coat them. Repeat until both sides are coated. Set aside and repeat this process until all the pork are coated.

Heat enough oil in a pan on medium. *Tip: to conserve on oil, you can use a smaller but deep sauce pan/pot. While there is little surface space which means you might have to fry in batches, you will use less oil.

Test oil with a piece of bread crumbs. If it sizzle quickly then it’s ready. Carefully add the coated pork into the oil and fry until golden brown. Flip and repeat on the other side. Remove and drain on paper towel.

Arrange on a platter with garnishes and/or serve with pickled carrots and daikon . ENJOY!

Steamed Chicken with Garlic Fish Sauce

This week at my local Lucky Supermarket Tyson game hen were on sale. It comes in 2 per platter and was going for a BOGO free! I jump at this sale and got a total of 4 game hen for about $8. No recipe in mind when I pick them up but because of their convenience size it disappear real quick once I get them home.

I wanted to make sometime quick & easy that doesn’t involve too much time in the kitchen. Steamed Chicken with Garlic Fish Sauce came into my mind in a flash. I set the steamer with some water and while I wait for that to come to a boil I give this baby a quick rinse and stuff it with some aromatics I had on hand like green onion, sliced ginger and a couple sliced of lime. The chicken was perfectly sized so within 30-40 minutes I got a nice juicy and succulent chicken waiting for me to dive in. YUM! Don’t have a steamer? Try poaching instead. First cook the chicken at high heat and then turn it off and allow to poach for 20-25 minutes. Crank the heat back to high for 5 minutes and repeat the process. You can use other cuts of chicken as well but adjust cooking time accordingly.

I allowed my chicken to rest for awhile so that the juices get distribute back into the meat and not flow when I break into them. In the meantime I prepared my simple yet finger-licking garlic-y fish sauce for dipping.

Steamed Chicken with Garlic Fish Sauce (makes 1-2 servings)
(Mon Jomhoy Nung Tuk Jroluk Ktum Saw Tuk Trey) ម៉ាន់ចំហុយនិងទឹកជ្រលក់ខ្ទឹមសរទឹកត្រី

Ingredients
1 game hen (weigh about 1-1½ lbs)
2 stalks green onion
4 slices ginger, cut about ¼ inch thick
1+ ½ lime, divided
water for steaming/poaching
5 large cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
6 red hot bird’s eye chili, roughly chopped, adjust amount if desire
3 tablespoons already prepared fish sauce (see recipe)
chopped cabbage (optional)

Method:
Bring a pot/steamer to a boil. Meanwhile rinse the chicken and stuff the cavity with green onion, ginger and ½ lime thickly sliced. Add chicken to the pot/steamer.

Steam on high heat for 5 minutes then reduce to the lowest setting. Continue to cook for another 20 minutes or until the juices run clear when your pierce the inner thigh. The meat should no longer be pink and it should be soft and succulent. Turn off heat and allow to rest.

Meanwhile, in a mortar and pestle add chopped garlic and chili. Pound into a paste. Transfer to a sauce boil and squeeze the juice from a whole lime. Add prepared fish sauce and give it a stir to combine. Taste and adjust to your liking.

Break/chop the chicken into pieces and lay it on a bed of chopped cabbage. Serve along with garlic fish sauce. ENJOY! :)

Quick & Easy Shrimp Congee | Rice Porridge


I’ve been MIA for sometime now. :) For the curious minds here is what happened. I was on braces for almost 3 years and when I finally got off they put me on retainers. I was suppose to wear them 24/7 and take them off only when I eat. Well, it was uncomfortable and I end up wearing them off and on, at night for the most part. Then when I was traveling, I sort of misplace it. I went without my retainer for more than a month. In May, I finally found the top, unfortunately the bottom still missing. After more than a month of not wearing my teeth shifted and the retainer barely fit. My teeth got very sore as the retainer took it’s place once again. With a sore mouth, I had to change my diet and the foods I cook and eat.

Congee or Rice Porridge is one of my favorite things to enjoy for breakfast or any time I’m not feeling well. I love all sorts of rice porridge from elaborate porridge like my Chicken & Shrimp to just plain porridge with a bunch of different side dishes. Today I share with you something in between. It’s what I call simplified quick and easy porridge. I happen to choose shrimp as my protein but you can switch it out with your favorite pre-cooked meats. To speed up the cooking process I reserved cooked rice from the day before. I also use frozen shrimp that I soak in cold water at the same time I started cooking. Meats and seafood can be used whole or chopped into small pieces. It all depends on your preference. I like to have my shrimp in every bite therefore I choose to chop them.

Quick & Easy Shrimp Rice Porridge (makes 1 serving)
(Baw Baw Bongkea) បបរបង្គា

Ingredients
3 tablespoons cooked rice
3-3½ cups of water
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon chicken powder
5 large frozen shrimp, soaked in cold water then peel and devein, chop or leave whole

Optional topping
2 thinly sliced ginger, cut into long strips
1 green onion (scallion) leaf, thinly slice lengthwise
1 teaspoon salted soy bean
1-2 dash ground white pepper
1-2 dash ground red pepper flakes
a wedge of lime

Method:
Add cooked rice and water into a pot and bring to a boil. Allow to boil for about 5 minutes then reduce to a low simmer, cover partially so that it doesn’t spill over. Stir occasionally making sure the grains doesn’t stick to the bottom. Cook on low heat for 20-30 minutes until you reach the desire consistency. If it’s too thick, add more water. If it’s too thin, you can also remove some liquid.

Up the heat back to medium and add chicken powder and fish sauce. Give it a quick stir follow by the shrimp. Seafood like shrimp takes very little time to cook. If using other pre-cooked meat then you just want to warm it up and bring it back to a boil.

Ladle rice porridge to a bowl. Add your choice of topping.

Serve hot with a wedge of lime.

Stir-Fried Mussels with Holy Basil

This incredibly fragrant and delicious stir fried mussels can be enjoyed as a main course served along hot steamy rice or with a fresh French loaf to soak all the wonderful juices.

Here I’m using previously frozen mussels that are in it’s half shell. They come in a 1½ lb container. You can definitely use fresh ones. Make sure you scrub them thoroughly and discard the open ones. It will also require just a little more cooking time. I am also using the tender Holy Basil which has a spicier and sweeter than Sweet Basil but you can also use regular Basil known as Thai Basil. Another key ingredient in this dish is the roasted chili paste. It is packed with many tasty ingredients like sugar, shallot, garlic, soyabean oil, dried chile, fish sauce, dried shrimp, msg, paprika.

While I made this mussels you can also substitute this with chicken or even pork.

Stir Fried Mussels with Holy Basil (makes 2-3 servings)
(Cha Krum Jompous Tear Maress Prov) ឆារគ្រុំចំពុះទាម្រៈព្រៅ

Video Tutorial:

Ingredients
1 tablespoon oil
2 teaspoons minced garlic
4 bird’s eye chilies, slit in half length-wise (discard seeds if you don’t like spicy)
2 tablespoons roasted chili paste
1 tablespoon palm sugar
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 cup holy basil leaves
1½ lb mussels

Method:
To ease the flow of cooking, combine palm sugar, fish sauce and roasted chili paste together. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

Heat oil in a pan until hot. Add minced garlic followed by chilies. Quickly stir until fragrant.

Add mussels and stir to coat with garlic and chili oil. Allow them to hang out another 2-3 minutes. Stir occasionally.

Add in roasted chili mixture. Stir until sauce thickens, about 3-4 minutes. However, if it’s too dry, you can add water or stock, 1 tablespoon at a time. Taste and adjust seasonings, if necessary.

Finally, add the holy basil leaves. Give it a couple more stir and remove from heat.

To serve, slide mussels and sauce onto a serving platter, mound them into a pile. Garnish with fresh sprigs of holy basil. ENJOY!

Vietnamese-Style Sour Soup with Shrimp


I’ve made Vietnamese-Style Sour Soup ,various time but finally this time I took some time to document my recipe in addition to making a cooking video to share. This is my Cambodian take on a very popular Vietnamese soup known as Canh Chua Tom or in Khmer called Somlaw Machew Youn Bongkong សម្លម្ជូរយួនបង្កង. Light and refreshing but yet yeild a lot of flavors from the fresh herbs and vegetable. Fried garlic topped at the end not only add a wonderful aroma but a hint of a smokey flavor.

Here I use plump black tiger prawns which cook fairly quickly. You can also use fish, chicken, or pork ribs. Meats take a bit longer time to cook. You would want to make sure that those meats are at least 90% cook before you start adding vegetables. Otherwise the vegetables will get mushy or soggy while waiting for the meat to cook.

Moreover, there are an abundance of vegetables you can use. I suggest you go with what you like. I’ve made this soup using orkra, elephant ear (kdard), and even water spinach (trokoun).

Vietnamese-Style Sour Soup with Shrimp (makes 3-4 servings)
(Somlaw Machew Youn Bongkong) សម្លម្ជូរយួនបង្កង

Video Tutorial:


Ingredients
2 tablespoons oil
1 tablespoon minced garlic
3½ cups water
1/2 tablespoon sugar
1½ tablespoons tamarind soup base
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 (16 oz) can quail eggs (yield about 18 eggs)
20 black tiger shrimp, peeled & devein (about 1 lb)
3 cups sliced fresh pineapple
1 jalapeños, sliced
1 small shallot, sliced
2 cups diced tomatoes
1 cup bean sprout
1 cup chopped sawtooth herb and/or rice paddy herb

Method:
Heat oil in a small sauce pan/pot. Test oil with a piece of garlic. If it sizzle right away then it’s ready. Add the remainder and fry until brown. DO NOT WALK AWAY! Garlic brown very fast. Stir it so they don’t clump. Once the garlic are fried, strain and set aside. Reserve the oil for another dish like fried eggs or sauteed vegetables.

Next, in a pot bring water to a rolling boil. Add sugar, tamarind soup base and fish sauce. Give it a stir to combine.

Add quail eggs gently so the soup doesn’t splash on you. Technically, the eggs are cooked so you are just warming them up again.

Add black tiger shrimp, sliced pineapples, jalapeños, shallots, diced tomatoes, bean sprouts and chopped herb. Give it a stir and allow it to come back to a boil.

Ladle to a severing bowl and E-N-J-O-Y!

Cambodian Green Mango Salad with Dried Shrimp


One of the highlights during my first trip to Cambodia back in 2006 was FOOD. Among the many authentic Cambodian dishes I sampled one particular stood out. In Battambang Province my Parents, relatives and I went out for dinner. I didn’t know what to order so one of my cousin suggested that I order Ngorm Makok (Ambarella Salad). I usually eat Makok pickled in a jar with salt and chili but never fresh and in the form of a salad. I gave it a go and within a few minutes the salad was on the table. The image and the flavors still linger in my mind until this day. It was so delicious! Then when I returned home I been wanting to recreate that dish but never had a chance to do so until my recent trip to Georgia. When I was there I popped my friend’s fridge opened and survey what was there. In the freezer I saw a bag of smoked fish that came from Cambodia. I immediately thought about my Ngorm Makok. It’s difficult to get my hands on fresh Makok in the states so I replace it with crispy and tart green mango. My recipe was based loosely on flavors I could recall from my 2006 trip along with my experience with making Cambodian salad. In no time I had my green mango salad with Cambodian smoked fish on the dinner table. Me and my friends all enjoyed it so much that I made it twice during my 5 days stay.

I don’t have Cambodian Smoked Fish at the moment so I just left it out and use dried shrimps instead. By pre-soaking the dried shrimp it will wash away the grainy stuff that might of been attached to them. It will also expand in size. I then toast to seal in the outer layer and pound it lightly with a mortar and pestle. This will keep it nice and crunchy and it doesn’t get soggy too quickly once it’s tossed in the salad. Chopped roasted peanuts are a great addition too but I totally forgot to include it this time.

Cook’s Note: If possible, try to buy the green mango in the vegetable section of the Asian Supermarket. The skin will have a light green color. The shape will be bit flat and oval. The flesh tend to be white or pale yellow. These variety has a crisp texture an a tart taste. Do not use the mangoes in the fruit section. Even though the outer peel may look green and hard to the touch, their flesh will still have that yellow color and tend to be soft and mushy when you cut into it unlike those you find at the Asian stores.

Cambodian Green Mango Salad with Dried Shrimp (makes 2 servings)
(Ngorm Svay Kjey Nung Bongkea Kream) ញុំាស្វាយខ្ចីនិងបង្គាក្រៀម

Video Tutorial:

Ingredients
1 medium size green mango, skin peeled and shredded
1 tablespoon lime juice (1 lime)
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
½ cup dried shrimp, pre-soak in water about 30 mins
1 teaspoon chopped fresh bird’s eye chili (optional)
1 small shallot, thinly sliced
¼ cup fresh chopped herbs (mint, green onions, sawtooth, or basil)
2 tablespoons chopped roasted peanuts

Method:
Heat a small pan and lightly oil it. Add dried shrimps and give it a quick stir. Fry it to give them a nice crispy texture. Transfer to a mortar and pestle and lightly pound it to break up the fibers. This will allow the shrimp to absorb the flavors from the dressing but also retain that nice and crunchy texture. Set aside.

In a large bowl mix together lime juice, fish sauce, sugar, salt and fresh chili.

Add shallots, green mango, dried shrimp and fresh herbs. Toss the salad to combine.

Transfer to a serving plate and E-N-J-O-Y!

Cambodian Lime-Marinated Beef Salad


Here is another Classic Cambodian dish that is popular among Cambodian household. Marinated beef is tossed with fresh herbs and different vegetables. Chopped peanuts provide that extra nutty crunchy taste. My addition of jalapeños added a nice kick to every bite. It does look a bit similar to the Thai Style Larb with Beef. The addition of Pahok juice makes this distinctively Cambodian, but it’s optional.

What prompted me to make this dish was the beautiful bright red radishes that were on sale this week at the market. I’ve never worked with these beautiful things before but I bought it anyways because it was only .50 cent per bunch. Then I remembered that my Mother had use it in several of her salad recipes. I went to my cookbook collection and settled with The Elephant Walk Cookbook.

As I flipped through The Elephant Walk Cookbook I came across the recipe for Lime-Marinated Beef with Bean Sprouts and Mint. Author Longteine De Monteiro & Katherine Neustadt stated in the book “I fear that this recipe has been lost to the younger generation, and I would like to help restore it.” Her message did get across to me. My recipe is adapt loosely from this cookbook. I added a few additional ingredients, tweaked the measurements to fit my taste and also adjust my method of cooking the raw beef.

To be honest this was my very first time making it on my own plus eating this classic dish even though my Mother made had made it several times when I grew up. Mostly for my Father and his friends when they come over to practice traditional music for Cambodian weddings. This was way back in the late 80s. Now the gathering are smaller and less often. Perhaps it’s because the thought of eating raw beef doesn’t sound appealing to us kids even when we were told that it is technically cooked once it’s been cut into paper thin slice and marinated in lime juice. Still, we shook our heads and turned away. Instead we made fried eggs and poured soy seasoning sauce on top to go with our hot steamy rice. Which is what I did (again) as a back-up plan when I made this.

I was hesitant to taste my salad at first even when I used a different cooking method. But after a bite with my eyes tightly close, man oh man, it was G-O-O-D. Now I wish I had done it a long time. This dish is fairly easy to make and most of the cooking time goes to prepping. IMO, the meat can be prepared in many ways. You can grill it before making the salad or pan fry it after marinating. It’s is totally up to you. That is one of the perks of cooking your own dish.

Cambodian Lime-Marinated Beef Salad (makes 2-3 servings)
(Plear Sachko) ភ្លាសាច់គោ
adapt from The Elephant Walk Cookbook

Video Tutorial:


Ingredients
½ cup lime juice
3 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon small stalk lemongrass, very thinly sliced
½ tablespoon finely chopped garlic
½ lb boneless top round, sliced as thinly as possible against the grain
2 tablespoons fish sauce
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons Pahok juice (optional)
1 small shallot, thinly sliced
3 radishes, skin slightly peeled and thinly sliced
1 jalapeños, thinly sliced (optional)
1 cup mung bean sprouts
1/3 cup loosely packed fresh mint leaves
1/3 cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves
2 tablespoons peanuts, roasted and coarsely chopped

Method:
Partly freeze the beef to make it a bit firm. This will enable easy handling and ease of thinly slicing the beef.

Combine half of the lime juice with 1 tablespoons of sugar, the lemongrass and half of the garlic in a medium bowl. Mix well, then add the beef, tossing to coat evenly, and set aside to marinate at room temperature for 25 to 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, combine the fish sauce, water, Pahok juice (if using) and the remaining sugar in a large mixing bowl. Mix until the sugar dissolves completely, then add the remaining lime juice, shallots, and the remaining garlic. Set aside.

Drain the beef, pressing gently with your hands to remove as much liquid as possible. At this point, you can either proceed with the next step, or like me, take it another step forward by bringing about 4 cups of water to a rolling boil and then add the beef to cook for just one minute. Remove and strain. Allow it to cool to the touch and press it gently to remove excess liquid.

Return the beef to the mixing bowl and add sliced radish, jalapenos, bean sprouts, mint, basil and half the chopped peanuts. Toss well. Transfer to a serving plate. Garnish the salad with sprinkles of peanut and serve.

Grilled Oysters with Spicy Lime Sauce

It’s been two days since I returned from my trip to Decatur, GA. I had a great time there. Toured many great places (will post pictures and video later) and had a chance to visit three different states while there. One of the highlights of this trip was cooking and eating with friends. We whipped up a lot of classic Cambodian dishes. If you were following me on twitter you probably saw my up-to-the-minute photos of those dishes. However, when I got back I was craving for something different, seafood. Unsure what triggered this craving but I was very happy when I picked up my mail and see that fresh oysters were on sale this week for only .50 cents each! It’s been a long time since I had grilled oysters.

Growing up in Stockton, CA my sister had a lot of gatherings with families and her friends. Oysters were pretty affordable there and they would buy them by the bag. I don’t know how many pounds there were but there were a lot in those bag. My Mother would sometime grill them and other times steam them. Some guest had their own way of making the sauce but my most favorite sauce to paired with grilled or steamed oysters in the shell is this spicy lime sauce. This sauce is very versatile and you can pair it with many grilled meats and seafood. It’s similar to the lime sauce that usually accompany Marinated Beef with Lime Sauce (aka Beef Lok Lac). The base is the same with a few extra ingredients added on. I’ve had it as dipping sauce as well where I simply grill some steak (un-seasoned), slice it thinly and wrap it in lettuce, cucumbers and fresh herbs then dunk it into the spicy lime sauce. DER-LICIOUS! :)


Grilled Oysters with Spicy Lime Sauce (for 10 oysters)
(Kjong Ang Tuk Jroluk Marech Kroach Chma)ខ្យងអាំងទឹកជ្រលកម្រេចក្រូចឆ្មារ

Ingredients
10 fresh oysters in their shell
½ cup lime juice
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
½ teaspoon sugar
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon crushed garlic
1 tablespoon finely chopped shallots
a handful of fresh chopped herbs (such as cilantro, basil, green onions, Asian mint)
water (optional)

Video Tutorial to make Spicy Lime Sauce:


Method:
Prepare the grill and meanwhile clean the oysters. Using a stiff brush scrub the oyster under cold running water. Make sure you scrub around the opening edges well. Rinse off any dirt off the shell.

Place the oysters on the grill so that none are overlapping. Place oysters so that they’re resting on their deeply curved halves of their shells so their juices don’t run out.

Grill for about 5-7 minutes or until the oysters starts to open. Carefully remove from grill.

To make the spicy lime sauce, in a bowl combine all remainder ingredients and mix well. Taste and adjust accordingly. If you feel that the lime is too strong for your taste you can dilute it with a couple teaspoons of water.

Some oysters might not open as wide as others therefore, you can use a fork to pry them open. Be careful, use kitchen towel if necessary. Serve on a half shell with some spicy lime sauce.

Easy Banana Fritters

What do you do when your banana turn spotty, black and overripe? Definitely do not throw them away. Save them for banana nut muffins, banana bread, and these easy banana fritters,. It takes only 5 minutes to put these ingredients together. They fry up in no time. This simple to make snack is pack with a sweet heavenly taste – wonderful bite of banana, soft, yet chewy in texture.


Easy Banana Fritters (makes about 20)
(Jake Jean Ngeay Sroul)
ចេកចៀនងាយស្រូល

Ingredients
2 large over-ripe bananas (or 3 medium size)
½ cup sugar
a pinch of salt
a dash of pure vanilla extract
1 ½ cup self rising flour, sifted
¼ cup of oil for frying

Method:
Mash banana and set aside.

In a mixing bowl add flour, add sugar, salt, vanilla extract, mashed bananas.

Use a fork or a whisk to mix them all together making sure that the overall mixture is neither too dry nor too wet.

Heat the oil and turn it back down to medium then drop tablespoonfuls of the mixture into it. Flip and fry until both sides turns a golden brown, scoop it up and drain it well.

Panko Crusted Fish with Lemongrass Chili Sauce


I got my inspiration for this dish after wandering along the frozen fish section of Costco. Some fish fillets cost up to $20 a bag! What I did was glance over and saw some of their frozen already crusted fish and immediately thought about my dinner. It’s been so long since I left Costco will less than $20 out of my pocket. Normally I drop close to $100 each visit. So very glad I can resist my temptation this time. :) Wonder I was end up getting? Definitely not those crusted fish fillets but a bag of bananas, a carton or eggs, 3 cucumbers and a case (12 cans) of corn kernels which I have yet to decide what to do with them.

Panko bread is a variety of bread crumb used in Japanese cuisine as a crunchy coating for fried foods. Panko is made from bread without crusts, thus it has a crisper, airier texture than most types of bread crumbs found in Western groceries. It flavorless really, and does not absorb as much oil when cook. Since my Lemongrass Chili sauce is a bit heavy on flavor I decided leave my fillets plain but with the crispy texture. You can choose to marinade the fish fillets first with a flavor of choice and then just coat it with the flour, egg and panko bread crumbs.

Panko Crusted Fish with Lemongrass Chili Sauce (Serves 2)
(Trey Jean Sroeuy Nung Tuk Mtess Kroeung) ត្រីចៀនស្រួយនិងទឹកម្ទេសគ្រឿង

Ingredients
2 fish fillets, I used tilapia
¼ cup rice flour, or any flour
1 egg, lightly beaten
1/3 cup panko bread crumbs
¼ cup oil for frying
green onions for garnish

Lemongrass Chili Sauce

2 tablespoons oil
1/2 small onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoon Khmer Kroeung
1 tablespoon red pepper powder
1 teaspoon crush red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon fish sauce

Method:
Rinse the fillets and pat dry. Make a station with 3 separate large plates one for flour, egg and panko bread crumbs. Use one hand (the dry hand) to dust the flour on lightly then move to the next station and drench the floured fillet with your other hand (wet hand). On the 3rd station return your dry hand and coat with panko bread crumbs. Press them in lightly so they stick to the fillet. Repeat this process until all fillets are done, set aside.

Heat oil in a frying pan and once they are hot add the fillets and fry them. Watch carefully as the bread crumbs tend to brown pretty quick. Adjust heat accordingly. You can start with med-high heat and then crank it up toward the end to get a nice golden brown crust. Cook both side and allow to rest on paper towel to remove excess oil, which should not be much.

Next, make the lemongrass chili sauce but heating oil and added diced onions. Stir and cook until soften then add garlic. Give it a quick stir to release it’s flavor and aroma. Do the same with the Khmer Kroeung. Adjust the heat accordingly so the ingredients does not burn. Add the remainder ingredients and finish off with several stirs. If you find the sauce a bit thick you can add more oil. Taste and adjust the flavors to your liking.

Plate it up and garnish with green onion. Serve with steamed rice.

Designed by Free Wordpress Themes and Sponsored by Curry and Spice